Tag Archives: CIBSE Ireland

CIBSE Members Hardship Support

During the current challenges brought on by COVID-19 CIBSE Ireland would like to remind all CIBSE members who are facing financial problems that they can approach the CIBSE Benevolent Fund for help.

The Benevolent Fund was set up in 1933 as the IHVE Benevolent Fund. Since then it has provided assistance to hundreds of current members of CIBSE and their immediate family members, as well as former members and their dependants.

If you are suffering hardship during the current crisis, the Fund may be able to help – please contact your local almoner who will to assess your situation to see whether the Fund is able to provide support. The CIBSE Almoner can be contacted at cibseirelandalmoner@gmail.com. Alternatively you can email benfund@cibse.org

You can also visit www.cibse.org/cibse-benevolent-fund for more information

Keep safe.

Lighting for sleep/wellness through lockdown

The importance of sleep in maintaining a strong immune system is well known but the effects of light on our biological clock, and to help us maintain good sleeping patterns, is less well known. However, this may now be critically important for us during this period of lockdown and is worth considering.

Human circadian rhythms operate on a cycle slightly in excess of a 24-hour cycle (24.2) so it is necessary to entrain our biological clock with the time of day on a regular basis. This should allow us sleep better at night and stay healthy, writes Kevin Kelly, Emeritus Professor at the Technological University Dublin, Past President of the Society of Light & Lighting, and Vice-President of the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers.

See full pdf of the article at  Importance of Lighting During Lockdown

Congratulations David Doherty

David Doherty, ex-CIBSE Ireland Chair and Director Business Development at T Bourke

In the face of the challenges being thrown up every day as a consequence of Covid-19, it is heartening for some good news to emerge. So, congratulations to David Doherty, ex-CIBSE Ireland Chair and Director Business Development at T Bourke, who has just been awarded the title of Fellow of CIBSE.

The Fellowship title is the most prestigious and senior professional title within the engineering profession and is awarded only to those who have excelled in their profession.

David has been — and continues to be — an influential member of the CIBSE Ireland committee, rebranding the association in Ireland in his time as Chair and taking it to the esteemed level is enjoys today.

John Doherty, David’s father, also received the title a number of years ago so this makes it a family double. Congratulations again David.

 

SDAR Awards 2020 entry deadline fast approaching

The SDAR Awards is a joint initiative between CIBSE Ireland and TU Dublin, supported by Building Services News. The awards are unique in that they are intended to disseminate knowledge, encourage research in sustainable design of the built environment and raise the quality of innovation and evaluation of such projects. Entries are required to critically evaluate real life data, and examine both successes and challenges within leading-edge projects throughout Ireland or further afield. This competition is open to architects, engineers and all professionals involved in construction projects, as well as postgraduate students.

Short abstracts (between 100 and 200 words max) for entry into the awards are now being sought and must be submitted by Monday, 17 February 2020, via email directly to Michael McDonald (Lecturer) of TU Dublin and CIBSE Ireland at michael.mcdonald@tudublin.ie.

Now that the built environment has well and truly regained full momentum, and is delivering many award-winning projects, this unique synergy between industry and academia allows greater potential for integration of modern low-carbon technologies and low energy design methodologies.

The SDAR* Awards competition is intended to create a platform for the growth of applied research in the area of sustainable design. Post Occupancy Evaluations (POEs) and similar critical appraisal of low-energy projects facilitate the transition from ideologically-driven innovations, sometimes offering poor value, to evidence-based applied research that proves value or identifies weaknesses that the industry can learn from. These successes and failures help inform the professional community across all the building industry disciplines.

From the abstracts submitted by the 17 February 2020 deadline, a shortlist will be selected by peer review, and those selected will be invited to prepare final papers by March 2020.

Candidates that present at the awards and also have a chance of publishing their papers in the SDAR Journal (arrow.dit.ie/sdar/)

This year’s final will take place in March/April 2020 in one of TU Dublin’s campuses. For further information contact:

michael.mcdonald@tudublin.ie.

END

 

Into the West … with Ryan Loney

 

Ryan Loney living the dream as he wholeheartedly embraces the spirit of the west.

When working in Dublin my perception was that everywhere the far side of the Shannon was some sort of wet, green wasteland. I pictured it as littered with Supermac’s where people spat on their hands to signify closing a deal (I’m sure my friends and colleagues in Galway will love me saying that!).

As the workload in Dublin got ever-higher in recent years, when the alarm went each morning I thought to myself, how long could I sustain myself financially if I didn’t go in to work at all. People often use the term “firefighting” when describing the modern workday grind but I don’t feel this does it justice … it’s more akin to stepping inside the reactor at Chernoybl every Monday and firing it up each week!

I used to think that unsuccessful people are unsuccessful because they sit around doing nothing. However, my experiences so far have taught me that it’s often more likely caused by taking on far too much, and never quite bringing any tasks or projects to fruition. That said, I can’t deny that I very much enjoyed my time in Dublin but I always felt that, in order to grow and develop into a more well-rounded engineer, I needed an opportunity to work outside of the capital.

So, when the opportunity presented itself – by opportunity I mean my partner telling me we’re moving to Galway next year – it gave me a unique chance to reinvigorate my passion for the industry while also maintaining a healthy work/life balance which was becoming increasingly difficult to do in Dublin.

I’ve been working with O’Connor Sutton Cronin and based in their Galway office since June of this year, although my role does involve the occasional trip to Dublin. To date I’ve found that projects in Galway don’t move at quite the same pace as in Dublin. Even more important still is that project management programmes operate in an environment where contractors, clients and designers work closely and form a reasonably-happy union. By contrast, some projects in Dublin were like a marriage gone wrong, even before the project arrived on site!

In my current role I’m split between our Dublin and Galway bases, the brief being to work with my colleagues to secure more projects in Galway by providing a quality level of service to our clients and design team partners

But so much for the work environment. What about the environment full stop? It has been an adjustment acclimatising to Galway weather. If Bob Dylan was right and the answer is indeed blowing in the wind, then someone from Galway must have heard it by now! I’m told the August we just experienced was “exceptionally bad” and that it’s not normally as wet. As wet? According to Met Eireann it rained 20 out of the 22 working days in August and, if I’m to be honest, I can’t recall either of the dry days.

Despite the perpetual wind and rain though, Galway is a city with an electrifying atmosphere and enchanting streetscape and scenery, not to mention the vibrant and friendly locals. It is an inclusive place bursting with art, music, culture and craic. It’s easy to see why visitors from all around the globe – including this one particular visitor from the east – have such an affection for it.

PS: I’m still Chairman of CIBSE Ireland YEN (Young Engineers Network) and continue to spread the CIBSE Gospel in the Galway region. Drop me a line at ryan.loney@ocsc.ie to get involved.

Expect another letter in the new year.

ATC aid Capuchin Day Centre

Declan Donnelly, ATC, presenting Jonathan Smyth with a cheque for the Capuchin Day Centre in Dublin recently. On the right is Paul Martin, CIBSE Ireland. The Capuchin Day Centre is this year’s CIBSE Ireland nominated charity and the contribution was raised at ATC’s open day.

Greg Traynor — An Appreciation

Greg Traynor
1940 – 2019

The Traynor name has been prominent in the industry since Greg’s father (Noel Snr)followed a career in all aspects of building services engineering further to an apprenticeship in a major contractor’s office in Dublin in the 1930s. Noel Snr subsequently moved to Northern Ireland during World War II, designing services for American bases and hospitals, returning to Dublin after the war to build the new sanitoria with the Department of Health. Greg qualified from UCD in Mechanical Engineering and Building Services Engineering in Southbank Polytechnic (now Southbank University). He followed his father into consulting engineering and lived and worked in London and San Francisco. Much of this international experience was incorporated into innovative designs, particularly in industrial projects, on his return to Dublin.

Noel Snr and Greg founded the practice of JN & G Traynor & Partners in 1974 and over the next 38 years – until his retirement in 2012 – Greg enjoyed the challenges, the innovations, the latest technologies and more importantly, the people who worked in all areas of the industry. Greg’s brother, Noel Jnr, and his sister, Michaele, also spent time in the practice.

I began working in the practice in 1995. It was immediately apparent that if you had a problem with a job and a spot of reassurance or lateral thinking was required, a conversation with Greg would either solve the issue or give you the confidence that you were making the correct decision. I recall one incident in which I was given the task of designing an escape route pressurisation system for a large multi-storey building. Greg was away at the time and I spent two days poring through the relevant British Standards and estimating the size of air gaps between landing doors etc.

The client was on the phone every  couple of hours looking for the fan size and panic had set in. Greg arrived back late on the afternoon of the second day and, after the customary “Allo Allo Allo” delivered in a deep baritone voice, was met with panic from me and the client on the phone frustrated and annoyed. At this stage I had about five completely different fan ratings. He calmly asked me “what’s your best estimate at this stage?”. I told him my best estimate and he said “that sounds about right – double it!”. It worked. He adopted this calm approach at all times to all situations. Perhaps this is missing from the industry today.

As stated previously, Greg had a keen interest in people in the industry and enjoyed meeting other consultants, contractors and sales representatives. No matter who you were and whether you came to the offices by appointment or unannounced, there was always a coffee or tea on offer. The conversation at these meetings invariably strayed from the topic in hand into industry scuttlebutt, mutual acquaintances, musicals, literature or one of the vast arrays of interests that Greg found time for while managing a busy practice.

Greg devoted much time to the industry outside of work and sat on many committees of Engineers Ireland and CIBSE Ireland. He was Chairman of CIBSE Ireland in 2000- 2001. His father, Noel Snr, was also Chairman of CIBSE Ireland in 1970- 1972. Greg took a keen interest in the formation of young engineers and always promoted the profession to prospective students. His adoption of low energy technology was ahead of its time and his experimental mind lead him to implement low energy technology (MVHR, LED Lighting & Ground Source Heat Pumps) in the refurbishment of his own house.

The systems were controlled and monitored by a complete building management system and he took a keen interest in the validation (or not) of the manufacturers claims against this measured data. Greg had a keen interest in technology, both in building services technology as well as office technology. The practice was one of the first to adopt CAD systems (Microstation and later AutoCad) and even though the practice had a small staff, regular updates to computer systems and servers were made to the consternation of Noel Snr: “What do you want another one of those boxes for”.

I don’t think the practice actually needed these regular upgrades but each new upgrade brought additional computing power for Greg’s interest in acquiring knowledge by Web researching. We would often divide the workload on a tender with Greg taking charge of the specifications and I designing and drawing. After a number of hours into the work, I would wander over to check a point with Greg but he could not be be disturbed as he would be half way through an academic paper on some obscure topic from an even more obscure American university.

He had  a very high intellect and had a breadth and depth of knowledge that I have never come across before or since. No matter what the problem or issue, work-related or not, consulting the “Oracle” was always the wisest thing to do.

The advent of high-speed broadband into the office brought many benefits but also some drawbacks. Once again, when specifications were being prepared by Greg, the Web would be consulted for details of an air handling unit and ten minutes later the screen would be showing something connected to science, nature or the arts. Greg had a great love of all things artistic and was a member of various musical societies and appeared in a number of shows over the years. He also had a great love of literature and enjoyed using quotes when the opportunity presented itself. When, as a junior engineer,

I had completed a report Greg would wander over and note that he would review the report to add: “Merely corroborative detail, intended to give artistic verisimilitude to an otherwise bald and unconvincing narrative” (W.S. Gilbert, The Mikado). His narrative was not confirmed to artistic classics and when a statement was made that “surely the radiator can’t be that size” this was often met with “it is, and don’t call me Surely” (The Naked Gun).

Greg was something of a hoarder of books and magazines of all descriptions. The office had collections of IHVE, CIBS, CIBSE, IEI, Engineers Ireland and ASHRAE magazines dating from the earliest editions. Engineering books and catalogues dating from the late 1800s were also collected. Upon moving out of the office in Lansdowne Terrace in 2008, this collection had to be sorted and decisions made whether to bring them with us, donate them or bin them. A couple of hours into this sorting, we would be merrily filling black sack after black sack.

Checking on Greg’s progress would invariably find him engrossed in a fascinating article from an early edition of a magazine or a concert programme with little or no progress made with the task in hand. We discovered that this work was best carried out when Greg was out of the office and the bags taken away before his return! Greg retired in 2012 and divided he time between Toronto and Dublin. He never lost interest in the industry, particularly the people in it, and each time we met he would ask about the practice, the latest technologies and, most importantly, the industry gossip and who was still “vertical and mobile”. Greg’s passing has left a void in the industry in a place reserved for a true gentleman.

Go n-éirí an bóthar leat 

Go raibh an ghaoth go brách ag do chúl

Go lonraí an ghrian go te ar d’aghaidh

Go dtite an bháisteach go mín ar do pháirceanna

Agus go mbuailimid le chéile arís,

Go gcoinní Dia i mbos A láimhe thú. 

PS: The issue of Building Services News containing this appreciation can be downloaded in pdf format by clicking on the Cover image below Greg’s picture.

Call for SDAR Awards Submissions

The SDAR* Awards is a joint initiative between CIBSE Ireland and DIT, supported by Building Services News. The awards are unique in that they are intended to disseminate knowledge, encourage research in sustainable design of the built environment, and raise the quality of innovation and evaluation of such projects. Short abstracts (between 100 and 200 words max) for entry into the SDAR* Awards 2019 are now being sought and must be submitted by Monday, 25 February 2019, directly by email to Michael McDonald of DIT at michael.mcdonald@dit.ie.

Entries are required to critically evaluate real-life data, and examine both successes and challenges within leading-edge projects throughout Ireland or further afield. This competition is open to architects, engineers and all professionals involved in construction projects. As the built environment has gained momentum and is delivering many excellent projects, this unique synergy between industry and academia allows greater potential for integration of modern low-carbon technologies and low-energy design methodologies.

The SDAR* Awards competition is intended to create a platform for the growth of applied research in the expanding green economy. Post-occupancy evaluation and similar critical appraisal of low-energy projects facilities the transition from ideologically-driven innovations, sometimes offering poor value, to evidence-based applied research that proves value or identifies weaknesses that the industry can learn from. These successes and failures help inform the professional community across all the building industry disciplines.

From the abstracts submitted by the 25 February 2019 deadline, a shortlist will be selected by peer review, and those selected will be invited to prepare final papers by March 2019.
Candidates that present at the awards also have a chance of publishing their papers in the SDAR Journal arrow.dit.ie/sdar/ This year’s final will take place in March/April 2019 in DIT.

For further information contact: Michael McDonald, DIT. Email: michael.mcdonald@dit.ie.

Embrace change but remember, ‘an quán dì yi’

Derek Mowlds, MSc, the Managing Director, PM Group Asia.

Reflecting on the industry since commencing employment as a designer approximately 23 year ago, the biggest change I have encountered is the rapid advances in technology and ICT. The fundamentals of building services design have not changed. However, how we work and communicate has completely transformed in the last two decades

I have seen and been part of this transformation from my humble beginnings in a design office in Mountjoy Square in Dublin (pre- AutoCad!), to VMRA in Dartry Road, then PM Group and onto PM Group’s Shanghai office in China. I am now the Managing Director of our businesses in Asia, and I felt that the best thing I could do for this piece is to share my thoughts on some of the key focus areas to successfully compete in, and deliver, projects in today’s exciting but sometimes unpredictable environment

These are in no particular order, as they may be applicable to various stages of business development and the project execution lifecycle, or to various stages of your own career.

Remain agile and flexible                                                                                             Building services engineers and the supply chain should remain agile and flexible in a very dynamic and changing environment. This may simply mean remaining open to different contracting models such as Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) or working with contractors on design and build projects; it may even mean an openness to travel for international experience, or work on projects with teams from multiple locations, or in a different sector.

Systems thinking                                                                                                                                                        Engineers are best placed to apply a “systems approach” to both engineering design and overall project delivery. Any project can be broken down into a distinct number of systems, many of which will be common from building to building, despite the sector. Focussing on the critical/key systems early can help drive decisions and improve project delivery and efficiency.

The systems approach can also be used to identify key interfaces with other design disciplines and encourage early dialogue and design coordination. Outside of engineering, there is an interesting resource that frequently refer to called the Systems Engineering Body of Knowledge (SEBoK – www.seebok-info.org) which provides key knowledge resources and references of systems engineering, organised and explained to assist a wide variety of users.

Lessons learned                                                                                                                                                             Always strive to capture and transfer lessons from one project to the next. Also refer to lessons captured from other projects in your organisation. Do this early in the project, before you encounter a repeat issue that could have been easily avoided. Without a robust “lessons learned” system in your organisation, valuable knowledge will be lost across projects as the design team will change, and people move on, but the key issues and challenges remain!

Be open-minded                                                                                                                                                        Always remain open to new technologies and innovations, and encourage innovation from all members of your team. Embrace the right technologies and approaches for your business and projects early, including BIM, LEAN, Construction Management IS (Information Systems) etc. However, remember that technology is an enabler, not the answer.

Continuous Professional Development                                                                                                          Stay in touch with your relevant engineering institutions, attend conferences and CPD events. Also, there is a huge volume of on-line CPD available. This raises another issue … for many the challenge now is managing your time as we are now “data rich and time poor”, according to a famous quote from Dr Kevin Kelly. It is also of huge importance to mentor and train the next wave of graduates in our industry. As you progress through your career, share your knowledge and experience to build the competencies of those around you.

Culture and communication                                                                                                                               Our clients, teams and colleagues now consist of a diverse mix of nationalities and cultures. This can actually improve team performance and efficiency based on the differing perspectives of individual team members. However, this requires leadership and mutual respect. Building services engineers also need to integrate into multidisciplinary design teams (often from multiple companies) to deliver projects requiring a huge dependency on soft skills in addition to technical acumen. There is a huge body of knowledge on culture and communications, plus regular seminars and workshops, that might be worth attending if you feel that improvement is needed in this area.

Safety first                                                                                                                                                                   Last, but by no means least, remember to keep safety at the heart of everything that you do. Think of safety in design and safety during construction. Then deliver safe assets and systems for those who will operate them into the future. In China we say “an quán dì yl” … safety first. Stay positive and watch out for signs of stress. I say this to both employers and employees, particularly on demanding projects. Remember, this is a marathon, not a sprint.

CIBSE Ireland Golf Outing Results

Liam McDermott, Grundfos, main sponsor (standing, second row, left) and Paul Martin, CIBSE Ireland Chairman (arms folded) with CIBSE Ireland Committee members and prize winners on the day.

The annual CIBSE Ireland golf event took place at Lutrellstown Golf Club recently with Grundfos as this year’s primary sponsor. The event attracted a huge turnout with 25 teams participating and all four-balls teeing off at 1pm in a shotgun start. A special mention goes to Stephen Weir who led the assigned CIBSE Ireland Golf Committee, managed the registration process, and officiated at the scoring. Paul Martin, CIBSE Ireland, presented the prizes on the night.

 There were many prizes won on the day including:

— €1,000 holiday voucher draw for hole in one/nearest to the pin on the 6th which was won by Eugene Smith playing with Jones Engineering with a nearest pin shot of 0.87m;

Other opportunities to win were on the 18th for Longest Drive sponsored by Edpac which was won by Paul Kinsella playing with Safeguard;

— Nearest the Pin,sponsored by Wilo, was on the 4th hope and this was won by Liam O’Reilly playing with the McKeon group;

— Along with individual prizes, the coveted PJ Doyle Trophy for the best score was won by Team Jones Engineering.

What made the win extra special is that PJ Doyle, who the Memorial Cup is named after, was an engineer with Jones Engineering Group. He died prematurely in 1989 and the trophy was donated to CIBSE Ireland in 1990 with John Purcell registering the first win in that year. In 2011 the format changed to a team prize, which continues today

Second place in the team event went to Edpac with Calpeda Pumps coming in third.

Teams starting returning to the clubhouse just under the four-hour mark with all reporting a good day … with little or no comment on their score cards! Following showers and refreshments, 100 people sat down in the clubhouse for their meal with prize giving taking place over desert.

See cibseireland.org for full picture gallery.