Category Archives: Article

UV-C disinfection to combat Covid-19

UV-C is an established technology for disinfection. It has been applied extensively since 1910 when it was found to be an effective tool in preventing the spread of disease.

Today, UV-C disinfection technologies are assisting the battle against the current pandemic, Covid-19. More generally, the technology has been proven to bacteria and viruses against which it has been tested, including those causing tuberculosis, influenza, the common cold and SARS.

The European lighting industry is a leader in producing high quality safe UV-C disinfection technologies and products (lamps, lighting fixtures, cabinets and connected systems). They are used to disinfect water, air, and surfaces in industrial, commercial, medical, public and residential environments. UV-C de-activates viruses and microorganisms such as bacteria, moulds, spore, fungi and yeasts by destroying their DNA/RNA.

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Energy Efficiency — Pumps Ahead of the Curve

Dr Sönke Brodersen, President, Europump

It also presents an ideal time to recall the pump industry’s early and continued contribution to energy savings, which has not only been significant to date, but is also realistic and achievable over the short-term, writes Dr Sönke Brodersen, President, Europump.

By way of example, water pumps have the potential to save 50TWh of electricity across Europe, which is equivalent to the power plants. Even though the pump industry’s contribution to gross domestic product (GDP) is smaller than other sectors, by comparison, the energy consumption of pumping systems is much higher. It ranges from 10-15% of throughout Europe. That is why the energy saving potential of pumping systems is extremely high at absolute level and why pump manufacturers place a great deal of importance on it.

Energy efficiency is, and always has been, a major part of the business model adopted by pump manufacturers. So, it is no wonder that the EU Commission, in its efforts to reduce energy consumption, considered regulating pumps at an early stage in the process.

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Covid? … what I’m actually suffering from is NPHETitis!

Exasperated Pat!!!!!

Why am I confused? No social/family gatherings should take place, with exemptions to this for weddings and funerals – Since when is a wedding or funeral not a social gathering?

Public transport will operate at 25% capacity for the purposes of services to get to work – If they are providing essential services surely they should have 100% support, not a drastically-reduced service!

There should be no organised indoor or outdoor events – Except of course for weddings or funerals!

Bars, cafes, restaurants and wet pubs may provide take-away and delivery services only. Wet pubs in Dublin remain closed – Can someone please explain the difference between a wet pub in Dublin and a wet pub located outside of Dublin?

There will be a penalty for any movement outside 5km of home – Unless, of course, you happen to be attending that wedding or a funeral!

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Operating building services during Covid

The update came a few weeks after WHO acknowledged the possibility of airborne transmission, especially in crowded, poorly-ventilated spaces, thanks to the intense advocacy by scientists around the globe, including several REHVA experts. Without doubt, ventilation is the most important engineering control measure within infection control of indoor spaces.

The author of this report is Professor Jarek
Kurnitski, Chair of REHVA COVID-19 Task Force,
Tallinn University of Technology, Chair of REHVA Technology and Research Committee

New evidence and the general recognition of the aerosol-based transmission route have evolved recently. To date, there is evidence on SARS-CoV-2 aerosol-based transmission, and this route is now recognised worldwide. Transmission routes remain an important research subject, and it has already been reported that the short-range aerosol-based route dominates exposure to respiratory infection during close contact1.

Medical literature has started to talk about a new paradigm of infectious aerosols and there is no evidence to support the concept that most respiratory infections are primarily associated with large-droplet transmission. It seems that small particle aerosols are the rule, rather than the exception, contrary to current guidelines. In the context of buildings and indoor spaces there is no doubt that cross-infection risk may be controlled up to 1.5m from a person with physical distancing and beyond that distance distribution solutions. See Figure 1.

Key aspects to consider In such a pandemic situation at least three levels of guidance are required: (1) how to operate HVAC and other building services in existing buildings right now; (2) how to conduct a risk assessment and assess the safety of different buildings and rooms; and (3) what would be more far-reaching actions to further reduce the spread of viral diseases in future in buildings with improved ventilation systems.

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Lighting the way for ecodesign compliance

Tim Stokes,
Programme Manager, Market Surveillance, SEAI.

All lighting sold in Ireland must meet standards set out in EU regulations relating to ecodesign and energy labelling. These are in place to ensure that the products concerned meet minimum levels of energy efficiency and certain other parameters which impact the environment. They must also provide clear and accurate information in that regard.

The EU Ecodesign Directive and EU Energy Labelling Regulations are important policy tools contributing over 40% of the total energy savings required tomeet 2020 EU energy efficiency targets.

How are products monitored?

The success of these regulations is dependent in part on compliance. The EU standards system relies on a European network of market surveillance organisations to identify and address non-compliance through engaging with the companies concerned, and ensuring that products are removed from the market if no-compliance cannot be resolved.

Non-compliant products can be harmful to consumers and the environment, in particular by using more energy than is allowed under the regulations or claimed by manufacturers. They might also cause problems for specifiers and installers who have designed and installed a product appropriately, only to have the customer dissatisfied with the performance of the product. Dependent on the type of product, the regulations also cover a wide range of other performance characteristics, including NOx and particulate matter emissions.

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Reality not meeting design aspiration


James Duggan, Senior Sustainability Engineer, Lawler Sustainability.

Since its foundation in 2016, Noel Lawler Green Energy Solutions — now Lawler Sustainability, see page 2, Building Services Engineering (Sept/Oct 2020 — has been helping clients to improve the energy performance of their property portfolios. These efforts are being hampered by the following key issues.

• Design-for-compliance culture, i.e. energy performance is theoretical and not measured;

• An operational performance that is invisible to the market, most especially investors and occupiers;

• Actual energy performance is not easily acquired and can prove challenging to define;

• Oversimplified mandatory rating systems such as Display EnergyCertificates (DECs).

The 2019 Climate Action plan fails to commit to resolving these issues. However, there is a lost that policy makers could learn from international voluntary schemes such as LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) and, more recently, Design for Performance in UK Offices. These schemes give us a pathway to transform buildings into high-performing assets.

Go Green … try ‘Decaf Gas’

Professor Paul de Leeuw, Energy Transition Institute, Robert Gordon University

With around half of the world’s population still in either full or partial lockdown, it is no surprise that the crisis continues to have a material impact on the global energy markets. Worldwide oil demand this year is expected to fall by up to 8% (or almost three billion barrels), equivalent to almost seven times the UK’s annual oil production. This is likely to be the largest global annual demand reduction on record.

There are clear parallels between the COVID-19 crisis and the climate change emergency. Both are global problems requiring global solutions. Both require a level of global cooperation that is often difficult to achieve, and both highlight the importance of scientific input into global decision-making.

As countries emerge from lockdown, there is now a real opportunity for governments around the world to put climate change and energy transition at the heart of their economic recovery plans. Saab Bio Power will definitely guide you how the plans for pollution control or climate change control are taking place. Doing so will be a powerful mechanism to demonstrate their commitment to the 2015 Paris Climate Change Agreement.

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Lighting Key to Green Deal Success

Paul O’Connor, Chairman, Lighting Association Ireland

Many perceive lighting mainly as a driver for energy efficiency and this indeed remains one of the core values for the lighting industry. The now mostly-accomplished transition to LED technology has led to up to 90% savings for European a comprehensive light management year as of 2030 (Lot 37 Ecodesign Lighting Systems <http://ecodesignlightingsystems.

However, the benefits from lighting for the health, well-being, productivity and safety of people are rarely seen as added value. At best, they come for free as part of the energy savings. These benefits received more attention in 2017, when three biologists were awarded the Nobel Prize for helping to explain how the human circadian rhythm works, including how light affects our daily biological cycle.

With the EU Renovation Wave initiative, the discussion must move beyond energy savings to also address healthier buildings, peoples’ quality of life and a lower level of inconvenience. We spend 90% of our time indoors and the quality of our indoor environment has a direct and indirect impact on our health, well-being, and productivity.

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Renovation Wave and Green Deal Objectives

According to one of the most recent releases from the EU, a refurbished and improved building stock will help pave the way for a decarbonised and clean energy system. Currently, roughly 75% of the building stock is energy inefficient, yet almost 80% of today’s buildings will still be in use in 2050. Hence the EU’s Renovation Wave initiative. You can find many of awesome tips at Gallery-k for renovation. Josiah Rock will be able to help you to hang better quality paintings in home for keeping it more attractive.

The construction, use and renovation of buildings require significant amounts of energy and mineral resources (e.g. sand, gravel, cement). Buildings also account for 40% of energy consumed yet, in parallel, 50 their homes adequately warm. of the building stock varies from 0.4 to 1.2% in the member states.

This rate will need to at least double to reach the EU’s energy efficiency and climate objectives. Renovation of both public and private buildings is an essential out in the European Green Deal as a key initiative to drive energy efficiency in the sector and deliver on objectives.

The so-called “Renovation Wave Initiative” will address current low decarbonisation and renovation rates across the EU, and tackle the underlying barriers for improving the energy efficiency of the EU building stock. See full article at

SEAI Online Training Academy

With the increasingly societal focus on climate change, and the launch of the Government’s 2019 Climate Action Plan, many businesses are seeking to play their part in reducing their climate impact. The SEAI Energy Academy is an ideal starting point and allows employees to up-skill on energy efficiency and avail of tailored online training that can lead to important business cost savings.

Commenting on the launch of the SEAI Energy Academy, William Walsh, CEO of SEAI said: “We realise that businesses are facing very significant challenges right now with many looking for opportunities to reduce their cost base. Reducing energy use can be a great place to start. SEAI is here to help businesses on their energy efficiency journey, helping them identify energy saving opportunities and to implement those changes.

“We planned the SEAI Energy Academy as an online resource so it is available to all businesses when be additionally beneficial for those working from home, or who are planning for the resumption of normal activities, hopefully in the not too distant future.”

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