Tag Archives: SEAI

Hywel Davis advises on Grenfel Tower Report

Hywel Davis, Technical Director, CIBSE UK, and a member of the UK Government Committee preparing the Grenfel Tower Report.

The business end of the visit involved a special briefing by Hywel to senior Government officials in relation to the probe being conducted into Grenfell fire disaster, and the report being prepared. The probe is led by Dame Judith Hackitt with the interim report already released. See: (www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-report-from-the-independent-recovery-taskforc). Hywel also had a separate briefing meeting with the RIAI.

On the social side Nial Bourke and David Doherty of T Bourke hosted Hywel, a proud Welsh man, as their guest to the rugby international in the Aviva stadium. Even with the result Hywel was in great form and has promised to return to Ireland to update everyone on the Grenfell final report, and to join us for CIBSE Ireland’s 50th anniversary dinner in the Autumn.

Schools visit to promote building services engineering                                                                  On the broader front, and to coincide with Engineering Week, Paul Martin and Mervin Doyle toured a number of schools in the Waterford region to try and get primary and secondary school children to consider building services engineering as a career. Mervin is a lecturer in the Waterford Institute of Technology in the degree in Building Services Engineering, and the Masters in Sustainable Engineering.

Their tour started in St Declan’s Primary school where Paul was a student over 30 years ago. They met Paul’s old teacher, Gerald Fitzgerald — still teaching despite having taught Paul for over three years — and Paul spoke to the children about sustainability and the environment. He concluded his presentation by showing them the latest Nisan Leaf electric vehicle kindly provided by John Flood of Nissan Dungarvan dungarvan.nissan.ie/

From there Mervin and Paul ventured into their old secondary school, De La Salle. Here they spoke with 4th and 5th year students about the WIT courses in building services engineering, and the related employment and career prospects. Much to Mervin and Paul’s disappointment, neither Derek McGrath (Waterford hurling Manager), nor Kevin Moran (Waterford senior hurling captain) were teaching that day … they were relaxing after hammering Cork in the league.

From here they went to St Paul’s School where again they spoke to over 50 students. Mind you, here the students were more proactive and there was some lively debate when they asked of Paul and Mervin: “who earned the most money”; “who drove the newest car”; and “who had the handiest job”. As CIBSE Ireland Chair Paul claimed the right to answer and said Mervin to all.

For more information about the Degree and Master (Part and full time) courses in WIT visit:—www.wit.ie/schools/engineering/building_services          www.wit.ie/courses/school/engineering/PostgraduateEngineeringDepartment%20of%20Built%20EnvironmentFull%20TimePart%20Time/msc_in_sustainable_energy_engineering

 

 

Was it Delilah or simply the barber?

New-look Paul Martin

Met up with Paul Martin early this morning and, as he entered the meeting room full of industry representatives and many of his SEAI colleagues, our collective jaws dropped. Paul’s trademark shoulder-length golden locks have been cropped to reveal a much younger-looking, cherubic profile.

Paul just would not be drawn on the reason for the dramatic hair style change but he assured all and sundry that, unlike the the Biblical Samson, has has not lost his strength along with his hair. When asked whether it was Delilah or merely the barber who had done the deed, he made his excuses and left!

SEAI Calling All Energy Engineers

Programme Manager – SME Support Programme                                                                                          This role will be required to create a new unit to work with SMEs on energy efficiency. Priority in 2018 will be to develop a strategy, design and roll out an expanded programme of support specifically targeted at the small and medium sized enterprise to leverage the opportunity presented by energy efficiency for this sector.

Programme Executive – Public Sector Energy Management                                                                        The role within the Public Sector and Business Department is to manage and co-ordinate the energy management support services that SEAI provide to the public sector to promote and accelerate energy management.

Programme Executive – Large Business                                                                                                        The role within the Business and Public Sector Department is to design and develop programmes, events and initiatives supporting those responsible for energy in client organisations with high energy use to adopt good energy management practices.

Programme Manager – EXEED Certified                                                                                                            This role will lead both the ongoing development of EXEED Certified and its supporting EXEED Grant programme. You will have ownership across the full EXEED value-chain.

Programme Executive – Market Surveillance Authority                                                                                This is a technical engineering role to support the operation and on-going development of market surveillance activities by SEAI. The role will principally focus on energy related products relating to eco-design, energy labelling and tyre labelling.

Programme Executive – Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme                                                                  This role will support the on-going Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme programme development and technical oversight activities.

Programme Assistant – Energy Policy Statistical Support Unit                                                                  This role will provide assistance in relation to statistical data management and analysis within SEAI’s Energy Policy Statistical Support Unit (EPSSU).

See   www.seai.ie/careers/ for full details

END

 

 

Designing future-proofed buildings for next 50 years

Paul Martin, Chairman, CIBSE Ireland

In the intervening years the industry has learned from the many mistakes made back in the late 1960s and early 1970s in particular. Building stock constructed since then has shown marked improvement but, as we look to design buildings that will be here for the next 50, we should not be complacent.

Buildings that are performing well now, and those currently being designed and built for the today’s climatic conditions, may become intolerable for occupants by 2068 (50 years time) unless we factor in concepts such as active cooling and associated high-energy usage. There is compelling scientific evidence that our climate is changing, and it is probable that average temperatures will increase by several degrees over the coming century.

These increases in temperature are expected to have a major impact on the indoor environment of buildings. It is essential that buildings being designed and built today are future-proofed so they can adapt to changes in external temperatures and humidity, light levels, energy usage and so on.

To be fair, the construction industry has already made significant steps towards tackling climate change through limiting the amount of carbon emitted – both in the materials used (embodied energy) and predicted energy usage – by using simulation programmes such as IES, along with BREEAM and LEED.

The energy message emphasis on heat-saving in winter using highly-insulated and airtight buildings also means there is a danger of overheating in the summer months. This presents a different challenge. CIBSE has produced quite a number of guidance documents in this respect, such as TM52 (The limits of thermal comfort: avoiding overheating in European buildings: Developed for “free-running” commercial buildings) and TM59 (Design methodology for the assessment of overheating risk in homes).

The health and wellbeing impacts of overheating (see Mona Holtkoetter’s article in October 2017 edition of Building Services News) can be significant for residents, resulting in stress, anxiety, sleep deprivation and even early deaths in heatwaves, especially in cases of vulnerable occupants.

Among the concepts now being embraced to combat these issues are highly-insulated pipework; insulated heat interface units; ventilated utility cupboards; LED lighting; and installing mechanical ventilation heat recovery units, with summer bypass and boost mode, to increase the ventilation rate when required.

Climate change is affecting how buildings will perform for occupants, both now and in the future. While overheating has emerged as a major concern, climate effects extend beyond the treatment of overheating. They also include flooding, drainage, water conservation and material durability. The CIBSE TM36: Climate Change & the Indoor Environment: Impacts & Adaptation (CIBSE, 2005) document again offers guidance and advice on these matters.

In considering the design of both commercial and residential buildings today we must address the known and anticipated challenges that lie ahead and consider, among other things, the following:

• To what extent will climate change increase the occurrence of summertime thermal discomfort and overheating in different types of buildings?

• To what extent will passive measures be able to improve summertime thermal comfort and ameliorate the increased tendency for overheating?

• How effective will different approaches to comfort cooling be?

• What are the energy-use implications of the various strategies?

While no one has all the answers, there is still a wealth of guidance freely available to all concerned in building services.

See www.cibseireland.org/membership/ for details, or contact CIBSE Ireland directly at contact@cibseireland.org

‘Deep Retrofit’ Breakfast Briefing at Architecture Expo

Denis Naughten, TD, Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment withJim Gannon, Chief Executive, SEAI and Ms Victoria Burrows, Project Manager, World Green
Building Council.

With an estimated one million homes in Ireland considered to be significantly energy inefficient, SEAI is undertaking a Deep Retrofit Pilot Programme to identify the depth of the problem, and to highlight the large-scale opportunities it presents to those engaged in the sector. It will also inform the nature of SEAI’s grant support for deep retrofit going forward.

Deep retrofit means just that … a holistic approach to retrofit that involves a whole-house solution, based on a fabric-first approach, twinned with the deployment of renewables and a move away from fossil fuels.

As part of its engagement with industry SEAI has teamed with CIBSE Ireland and ASHRAE to present a Deep Retrofit Breakfast Briefing at Architecture Expo, the RIAI show held in conjunction with the RIAI Annual Conference. Date is Friday, 6 October and the venue the Main Hall, RDS. It will commence at 10.30am and conclude at 12noon. Teas/coffees/croissants etc served from 9.45am. Participation is free.

The event will be “hosted” by a select panel of industry experts. After very brief introductions, 90% of the proceedings will comprise panel members fielding questions from the floor, and inter-acting with one another, to share their respective views and opinions. The open forum format is designed so that all participants — panel members and audience alike — contribute to the learning curve.

SEAI is currently looking for pilot projects to kick off the initiative and will provide 50% funding of the total capital costs, and project management costs (including design fees), of the projects selected. Consequently, the Pilot Programme in itself is also a major opportunity for industry to engage with SEAI in this process.

Log on to www: form.jotformeu.com/AGHF/deep-retrofit-breakfast-briefing to pre-register your attendance.

 

 

Building Services Engineering Graduate Builds Career from Level 6 Start

Paul Martin, SEAI Programme Manager and CIBSE Ireland Chairman

Looking back to his Leaving Cert subjects — accounting, geography and business studies — Paul comments that they weren’t “traditional” engineering subjects but his interest in engineering was evident from an interest in how things worked … much to the detriment of his sister’s CD player. From his Level 6 Higher Cert, Paul progressed onto a level 7 add-on and, from there, he went to the UK to do further studies.

“Now that that the economy and construction are picking up“, notes Paul, “and there is a huge demand for building service engineering graduates and says that, compared with traditional engineering qualifications, building services engineers are paid more.”

Paul is now a Chartered Engineer and Programme Manager for Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) and in charge of Technical Standards Development. “My day to day job is developing standards that will insure that we will live in a more sustainable country, and in influencing other EU countries to follow our lead,” he explains.

In 2017 he was elected Chairperson of the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers, Ireland Region. “This position will allow me to help influence our members (and beyond) in the latest and greatest engineering developments.”

“I am a very proud graduate of WIT and I was delighted to see the standard of the course held high (20 years on) when I judged the Building Services Student Awards last year in WIT. The lecturers always had time for their students and in particular were always helpful when I couldn’t get my head around some of the aspects of the course.

“I couldn’t recommend the Building Services course in WIT more. I know talking to employers that graduates from WIT are held in high esteem”, concluded.

Related Courses in WIT

Higher Certificate in Engineering in  Building Services Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering in  Building Services Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in  Sustainable Energy Engineering

 

Home Heating Heroes Do It Best!

Joe Durkan, EEOS Programme Manager, SEAI

Plumbers and installers are the “go-to” guys in these situations. Whether it is emergency repairs, upgrades or a completely new installation, homeowners rely on their knowledge and expertise to advise them on the right approach. They represent the interface between  the home owner and the wider world of energy efficiency. They have become, in a sense, energy ambassadors.

This is because, in order to ensure that the heating system is correctly specified, the plumber first needs to be able to accurately determine the actual heating demand of the home based on the details of the property and the needs of the occupant. This is where a great opportunity lies, because in order to calculate the heating load, the specifier needs to assess the building fabric, ventilation system and existing distribution system in the dwelling.

In the case of new or yet to be built dwellings, all of the information to determine this data should be readily to hand. Details of the construction, such as the levels of insulation, build type, ventilation systems etc, should all be known and these, in conjunction with the Building Energy Rating (BER) heat loss calculations, will help accurately determine what the heating requirement will be.

However, the majority of heating system installations are more likely to fall into replacements or upgrades. In these cases, especially when a BER isn’t readily available, the specifier has to determine the heating demand the old fashioned way. CIBSE’s Domestic Heating Design Guide (www. cibse.org/knowledge/knowledge-items/ detail?id=a0q20000008I7odAAC) is the key tool in these situations. The guide shows how to identify the principle heat loss areas in the dwelling, and how to calculate the relevant u-values, ventilation rates and distribution losses necessary to determine the heating requirements of each room and the overall hot water and space heating demand.

Minimising this overall heat demand is the key to an economical and efficient heating solution. Ultimately, the type of heat source is secondary to the more important considerations of ensuring that the heat demand can be met efficiently and economically, and that all elements are installed to the proper standards.

The information gleaned in the initial the homeowner could carry out, such as insulation or controls upgrades, that will reduce the overall heating demand. This is the opportune time to consider these works, and carrying them out in conjunction with the heating system upgrade will be more economical. The overall result will be greatly-improved levels of comfort and reduced heating bills (courtesy of the appropriately-sized heating system).

Almost certainly, the new heat supply (whether it’s a boiler, stove or heat pump) will require a lower rated heat output than the unit it is replacing. This is because the overall efficiency of heating appliances has improved dramatically over the last number of years. Therefore, it is vital that the installer accurately determines  the heat load required to ensure that  the replacement unit is correctly sized to operate at maximum efficiency.

Click on the image right and see full article on Pages 14 and 15.

Paul Martin elected Chairman of CIBSE Ireland

Paul Martin (left), newly-elected Chairman of CIBSE Ireland being congratulated by outgoing Chairman Brian West

The annual general meeting of CIBSE Ireland was held recently in the Sandymount Hotel in Dublin. Outgoing Chairman Brian West reported on the successful year and summarised events held throughout the latter end of 2016 and the first quarter of 2017.

These included 24 CPD events at various locations throughout the country, along with the Irish Lighter Awards, the membership briefing, WIT and DIT student awards, the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering student awards, the SDAR Awards, the Pat Benson lecture and the Annual Christmas Lunch.

New Chairman Paul Martin and Vice Chairman Damien Flynn were elected, along with a new committee for 2016/17, including some fresh faces. The formalities concluded with a meal, networking and social interaction.

The new committee will work on the forthcoming programme of events over the summer months but the season will kick off with the CIBSE Ireland annual golf outing at Castlewarden Golf & Country Club on Friday, 1 September next. Main sponsor is Heat Merchants Group but there are also other sponsorship opportunities.

For details, and to enter a team, log on to http://www.cibseireland.org/

Welcome new approach to heat pumps in DEAP

HPA SQUARE logoIn a move that has been wholeheartedly welcomed by the sector, SEAI has updated the methodology for heat pumps in the Dwelling Energy Assessment Procedure (DEAP).

The approach to heat pumps now applicable in DEAP is based on mandatory performance requirements for heat pumps across Europe under the Ecodesign (2009/125/EC) and Labelling (2010/30/EU) European directives.

This update uses test data to standards IS EN 14825-2013 for space heating and IS EN 16147- 2011 for water heating and derives seasonal performance data for entry in DEAP based on IS EN 15316-4-2-2008.

These directives are a legal requirement for heat pumps placed on the market from 26th September 2015. Where heat pumps are not required to comply with and do not comply with those directives, then the methodology uses the current approach in DEAP V3.2.

Triple E Register boost for product suppliers

Conor Hanniffy, SEAI ACA Project Manager

Conor Hanniffy, SEAI ACA Project Manager

With the Accelerated Capital Allowance, when money is spent on energy efficient equipment products listed on the SEAI Triple E Register, a company can deduct the full cost of this equipment from its profits in the year of purchase.

The ACA benefits                                                                                                                  — Reduced tax bill

— Increased cash flow

— Reduced energy costs

— Clear market differentiation

The scheme was first introduced in 2008 under the Finance Act. It was extended in 2011 and, more recently in 2014, for a further three years. The scheme now supports 52 technologies across 10 categories and has successfully grown to close on 14,000 products listed.

SEAI’s technical advisors work with industry in developing the product eligibility criteria in considering market developments and standards in support of equipment efficiency performance. SEAI provides two submission periods in considering new products for inclusion each year and SEAI personnel are available to assist product providers in clarifying requirements.

Key beneficiaries                                                                                                                                                   Key beneficiaries of the ACA scheme include product providers such as manufacturers, distributors and agents. Product providers submit products to the ACA Triple E Register for registration to help provide confidence and clear differentiation of product performance to the marketplace.

Products listed on the ACA Triple E Register demonstrate to the market that the product is high-performing energy efficient equipment. It also provides the financial benefits offered through the ACA to clients installing the products concerned.

End-user benefits                                                                                                                                   Organisations paying corporation tax benefit from the tax relief in year one of the purchase of the equipment. They also benefit financially from the energy efficiency of the equipment because of lower energy running costs.

Public sector procurement                                                                                                                               Under Public Procurement Regulations introduced in 2011 (European Union Energy Efficient Public Procurement Regulations, SI 151 of 2011), public bodies, in fulfilling an exemplary role with regard to energy efficiency, are obliged to procure only equipment which is (a) listed on the Register or (b) satisfies the published SEAI energy efficiency criteria for the equipment.

Accountants/finance                                                                                                                                 Accountants managing and advising the their clients can identify the financial benefits of investing in energy efficiency equipment listed on the ACA Triple E Register in term of the tax rebate, and also the financial return on investing in energy efficiency equipment.

Architects/engineers                                                                                                                                   Engineers and other specifiers who select equipment listed on the ACA Triple E Register provide clear market differentiation of the higher energy performance and greater financial benefits such products offer, together with providing an energy efficient design.

For more information and an example of how the ACA scheme works for the benefit of all log on to www.seai.ie/aca