Category Archives: Article

Building Regulations Part B and Fire Rated Downlights (Updated 31.08.17

Mark Walshe, Technical and Quality
Manager, LED Group and Lighting Association
Ireland Technical Committee member.

When you consider the regular pattern of recessed luminaires that is likely to greet you when you cast your eyes up to the ceiling in many new homes, the concept of a fire barrier may lose much of its integrity. How many perforations does it take for a ceiling to lose its fire rating? Facetiousness aside, non-fire-rated downlights will not provide the same level of fire protection as the ceiling in the event of a fire.

Fire-stopping of any openings in a fire barrier is a serious health and safety concern, as outlined in the Building Regulations 2017 Technical Guidance Document B – Fire Safety Volume 2 Dwelling Houses, updated earlier this year. Section 3.7 and particularly Section 3.7.5 in Volume 2 deals directly with the requirements of fires in dwelling houses.

Although you won’t find downlights mentioned explicitly in the document, it is clearly spelt out that any openings in a fire barrier element must be fire-stopped to ensure that fire resistance is not impaired. This would imply that there is a requirement for recessed lighting to have integral fire protection, or for non-fire-rated recessed lighting to be installed in conjunction with a suitable fire-hood.

Technical Guidance Document B – Fire Safety Volume 1 Non-Dwelling Houses is currently under review and expected for release in 2018 so, for now, the 2006 version of Technical Guidance Document B remains applicable. This document again sets out the requirement for all openings in a fire barrier to be fire-stopped.

However, there is a caveat in the case of timber-frame apartment blocks. These may use a compartment floor where the ceiling is effectively a sacrificial layer and does not constitute a fire barrier. There was a time when LED fittings with integral fire protection were simply not conducive to this application due to high cost, low performance and poor reliability linked to over-heating, but that day is well and truly over. A good quality LED FRD (fire rated downlight) such  as the ROBUS Triumph would be an ideal choice in this instance as it, and similar high-quality products, tick all the relevant boxes. Features of the ROBUS Triumph include:

— Rated for 30/60/90 minute fire rated ceiling/floor constructions=> fire safe;

— It is eligible for the SEAI Triple E ACA Scheme => energy and cost incentives;

— It meets the acoustic testing requirements of the Building Regulations => insulates noise;

— It meets the air tightness test requirements of the Building Regulations => minimises air leaks;

— It has a quick-fix connector and insulation spacer guard => ease of install;

— It has a 5-year warranty => reliability and peace of mind.

Fire testing of LED FRDs to the relevant standard (BS476 Part 21) is an expensive business as it involves constructing suitable ceiling box samples (complete with fittings) to be tested in a furnace at up to 1000°C for 30/60/90 minutes duration. Then there is the specialist work of analysing the test results with consideration of load bearing in order to make a judgement on the overall fire rating of the fitting.

Proof of meeting these requirements should be requested as part of any fire safety certification or risk assessment. Generally, for new builds and refurbishments with material changes, the only situations where FRDs need not be considered as essential in the case of recessed lighting installations are in bungalows or in the roof ceiling of multi-storey dwellings.

It is the responsibility of the Assigned Certifier to ensure that a building meets the requirements of the Building Control Regulations as set out in the Building Control Act, 1990 by means of the signed Certification of Compliance on Completion. The most straightforward means to achieve this is to follow the appropriate Technical Guidance Documents, as otherwise, alternative evidence must be provided to prove that the regulations are met.

In addition, for non-dwellings the Building Control Authority must issue a Fire Safety Certificate. All stakeholders in the installation of recessed light fittings, from installers through to building control authorities, would do well to take note of the requirements as set out in Part B in relation to installation of recessed lighting.

If your home had a hole in the roof, you wouldn’t think twice about plugging it to prevent a leak. Shouldn’t the same consideration be paid to the holes in our ceilings in the event of fire?

New focus on health and ‘WELL Being’ in building design

Mona Holtkoetter, Arup

Most people can correlate to scenarios where buildings or surroundings have a negative impact on our health. Why are you feeling more stressed after sitting in a meeting room with bad  acoustics for several hours? Have you experienced the post-lunch coma and tried to fight against it with a large amount of coffee in the afternoon? Have you left the full-day conference in a room without access to daylight and then been blinded by the sun when leaving the building? Have you experienced back pain from sitting at your desk all day?

Then there are the not so obvious effects of the indoor environment to your health? What is the indoor air quality that we breath for 90% of the day? What is the drinking water quality from the kitchen tap? A large amount of research has been published to analyse these questions. This research has been transformed into a new building certification system, the WELL Building Standard, bringing the key items together.

So, what does the WELL Building Standard include and how can we, as professionals in the built environment, play a key role in enhancing the health and wellbeing of occupants? How can we contribute to tackle main lifestyle-related  health epidemics, such as stress, obesity and muscular-skeletal complaints?

The WELL Standard separates the opportunities to promote health and well being in buildings into the following categories: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mind.

Air                                                                                                                                                                                  We breath more than 15,000 litres of air each day but outdoor air quality is deteriorating globally due to pollution from traffic, construction, agricultural activity, combustion and particulate matter. When considering the outdoor air quality, filtration of outdoor air by air handling units becomes a critical component for the HVAC design of a building services engineer. But which of the components mentioned above is captured by the F7 filter that we usually specify? Is this sufficient or do we need to re-think?

Further important aspects of indoor air  quality are ventilation levels, selection of combustion equipment, management of pesticides, cleaning practices to remove microbial pathogens and exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which can evoke asthma, allergies and can impact on productivity.

Water                                                                                                                                                                            While the objective when considering water at design stage focuses on accessibility to drinking water to promote hydration, the main emphasis should be the water quality. As building services engineers we are responsible for planning the water installation, but testing the water quality is typically not within our scope. We are purely relying on the water supplied by the city council to be the correct quality. While the Irish drinking water is tested for compliance with the EPA standards, not all contaminants dangerous for the human body are covered by these tests.

Also, any impacts on drinking water quality through pipework distribution is typically ignored. WELL requires a broad assessment of the water delivered at the site and requires the installation of adequate filtration if needed.

Nourishment                                                                                                                                                                To avoid the post-lunch food coma and reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and cancer, access to healthy and balanced food within a building or its surroundings is key. A healthy food offer goes hand in hand with healthy food advertising and information about ingredients, and can be advanced through the provision of gardening space. Imagine you are working late and instead of going down to the vending machine to buy a chocolate bar, you are going onto the balcony to pick an apple from the tree?

Light                                                                                                                                                                              The lighting codes we currently design to provide recommendations on illuminance levels to ensure sufficient light is provided for the task, to avoid eyestrains, to maintain productivity and to reduce headache. But light also influences our internal body clock that synchronises physiological function. Lighting exposure plays a key role for our sleep patterns and sleep deprivation can have a negative impact on our health and wellbeing. Do we need to go beyond code compliance to ensure our lighting design is providing a healthy environment?

Fitness                                                                                                                                                                Inactivity is now one of the biggest threats to public health, directly attributable to 9.4% of all deaths worldwide. While we as building services engineers have limited influence to the design for fitness, there are great opportunities to promote fitness within the built environment. This can go from the promotion of staircases, to the provision of bicycle parking, shower and changing facilities, gym or other internal or external fitness opportunities. Or, better still, how about combining fitness and work? Great innovations, such as sit-standing desks, treadmill desks or bicycle desks are already available on the market.

Comfort                                                                                                                                                                        Open-plan is the office layout of choice for most companies in Ireland. While it is great for collaboration with colleagues, the provision of quite areas to concentrate or make a phone call is important. As building services engineers, the selection of HVAC equipment has a great influence on the acoustics. Next to acoustic comfort, thermal comfort is important. While I typically sit at my desk with my jumper on, drinking a tea, my colleague next to me sits in a t-shirt and asks if we could open the windows as he feels too warm.

We are a key example for different temperature preferences. Why not be innovative with our HVAC design and provide different temperature gradients within a building?

Mind                                                                                                                                                                              Our minds and bodies are inextricably connected and play a vital role in our health and wellbeing. Buildings can provide spaces, such as balconies or green areas to reduce stress levels and promote relaxation. Workplace policies can have a positive impact on mood, sleep and stress levels, and can positively benefit our overall health and wellbeing. The reaction to indoor plants provided in the first WELL-certified office building in the UK was employees fighting about the plant positioning – they all wanted the plants to be located close to their desks. Maybe planting is not the best strategy for stress reduction after all!

CIBSE Ireland ‘Florida Scramble’ Success

Overall winners — Alan Hogan, Heat Merchants with Team Winthrop Engineering members Michael Murray, Donal Clavin, Barry Hennesy and Darren Kavanagh.

This year’s primary gold sponsor was Heat Merchants, with Wilo (longest drive) and Mitsubishi Electric (nearest the pin) the two silver sponsors, and a broad cross-section of the industry sponsoring all of the individual tee boxes.

The decision to have a holiday voucher to the value of €1000 for the hole-in-one competition made for great excitement as each of the 104 golfers on the day knew that one of them was going to go home very much in the holiday mood. As it happened, Brian Harrison was the lucky winner and Alan Hogan of Heat Merchants on hand to make the presentation during the after-golf meal.

Indeed, an additional benefit of the Florida Scramble format is that virtually everyone stays on for the meal and presentation of prizes so the atmosphere is electric right up to the departure of everyone at approximately 7pm.

Apart of their generous overall sponsorship, Heat Merchant’ prize selection was also excellent and went down very well with all the winners.

Given the beautiful weather and near-perfect condition of the course, scoring was high with Winthrop Engineering emerging triumphant to claim first prize and the much-coveted PJ Doyle Perpetual Trophy. Second was the Air Movement team with Unitherm coming in third.

Longest drive was won by Declan Sherlock of Team Air Movement while Mark Fallon of the Team Heat Merchants A  won nearest the pin.

All credit to the CIBSE Ireland team on the day for making it such a special occasion, and particularly Declan Kissane who handled the registration and scoring, and then acted as MC for the evening.

Adam Dent of the CIBSE Ireland Committee made the presentations as Chairman Paul Martin, who was present for most of the day, unfortunately could not make the presentations.

 

 

Crystal Air Wins Special Recognition Award for Zalando

The Panasonic PRO Awards were presented at the iconic Shard building in London where Crystal Air directors David O’Brien (left) and Domnick Ward (right) accepted the Award. In the centre is Vincent Mahony, National Sales Manager, Panasonic Ireland.

The overall project brief was to convert an existing 19th century docks warehouse into a funky office space in Dublin’s Silicon Docks district”, says Don Hoban of Crystal Air, “and our responsibility was to deliver a heating and ventilation solution that reflected this. The end user, Zalando – a fast-expanding online provider of shoes and fashion – found that rapid growth meant their existing Dublin base was too small so they needed new space, and quickly. They needed to provide for their current numbers as well as growth for new staff.

“Part of the attraction of the Silicon Docks for the likes of Zalando is its central location in the heart of Dublin, and also the proximity of major international technology firms (and talent) such as Google, Yahoo, Facebook, AirBnB, etc. This, however, also meant that both the building exterior and interior, including the air conditioning and heating solution, had to reflect the ultra-modern iconic style of its neighbours”.

The brief for the project was extremely challenging as the building featured an exposed truss roof design – with the services needing to be exposed and kept above the bottom of the truss – wherever possible. This meant that all the workmanship had to be top quality because it was all on show to the client, and to their clients. In addition, this had to be done with minimal changes to the building fabric, and to a very tight schedule.

Working closely with Willie Bennett, Project Manager, FKM Group, Crystal Air opted for Panasonic because of the energy efficiency and flexibility of its 3-pipe air conditioning system. A key technical feature was the ability of the ducted units to have sufficient fan power to drive warm air to the floor without being too noisy for an open plan office. The Panasonic 3-pipe ECOi MF2 Series was the obvious choice.

Fresh air via energy recovery ventilators                                                                                                “Because of the limited availability of plant space”, continues Don, “it wasn’t possible to provide a central AHU externally or internally without losing space or a need for major support steelwork. So, fresh air needed to be delivered using energy recovery ventilators (ERVs). These we located in the roof space, so we saved plant area without compromising on building comfort.

“In addition to using two highl-efficient 3-Pipe ECOi VRF systems matched to a central controller, the ERVs are also connected to the central controller using CZ-CAPC2 modules. This allows us to use the scheduler facility in the central controller to maximise the free air cooling.

“During the summer months we can purge the building at night, thereby allowing the night air to cool the building for a fresh start to the day. Then during the day we reduce the number of ERVs running at lunchtime when there are less people in the offices

Central controller                                                                                                                                                “The central controller acts as a master scheduler for the entire office, including the cellular spaces. These spaces have local controllers to give full control, but we also use the scheduler to provide additional ‘stop’ points to shut off the meeting room in those all-too-frequent occasions when, after a meeting, the AC is left running. In addition, the cellular spaces have been fitted with ‘ECO NAVI’ presence detectors to reduce the energy consumption when the rooms are unoccupied.”

This is only one of five Panasonic PRO Awards presented throughout all of Europe in 2017. It speaks volumes for the efficiency and performance of the system, but also the quality of the installation. It not only delivers the optimum indoor working environment, but also complements and indeed enhances the interior décor.

For further information contact: Vincent Mahony, National Account Manager, Panasonic Ireland. Tel: 087 – 969 4221: email: vincent.mahony@eu-panasonic.com or Don Hoban, Business Development Manager, Crystal Air. Tel: 086 – 444 4588; email: don@crystalair.ie

Revision to EN 378 Now in Force

The Institute of Refrigeration Ireland (IRI) sits on the EN 378 Technical Committee and the Working Group, and both continue to meet two or three times per year to address outstanding queries and ongoing developments relating to the Standard. The next meeting is scheduled to take place in Aachen in November 2017.

Familiarity with EN 378:2016 is crucial for companies who design, construct, install, commission, operate, maintain or use vapour compression systems for refrigeration, air-conditioning, heat pumps and chillers.

The Standard is published in four parts and, thanks to IRI’s active participation in the Working Group and its engagement with the National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI), it has secured a very significant discounted price of €155 for IRI members for the full set of four parts. As far as IRI is aware, this is the lowest price for the Standard in any EU member state, even with the IRI membership fee included!

It is worth noting that Part 2 (and the introduction, terms and definitions of Part 1) of EN 378 are harmonised with the Pressure Equipment Directive and the Machinery Directive. In fact, one of the drivers for the revision was to better align EN 378 with the Pressure Equipment Directive which has itself also been revised.

Members wishing to purchase a copy of the four parts of the EN 378:2016 Standard should contact the NSAI directly. Simply send an email with your name and IRI membership number to info@ standards.ie and quote “special IRI members’ discount for IS EN 378 Parts 1 to 4: 2016”. Alternatively call NSAI at 01- 857 6730.

JOIN THE IRI                                                                                                                                                             If you are not a member of the IRI and wish to avail of the offer then contact the Institute of Refrigeration Ireland. You can join by calling 0402 – 23586, or by emailing info@ instituteofrefrigerationireland.ie

Million Home Retrofit Opportunity

Denis Naughten, TD, Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment with Jim Gannon, Chief Executive, SEAI and Ms Victoria Burrows, Project Manager, World Green Building Council.

To tackle this challenge and to support the learning process, SEAI has unveiled the Deep Retrofit Pilot Programme, with support funding from the Department of Communications, Climate Action and the Environment. This new multi-annual pilot programme – with an initial budget

of €5 million in 2017 – will focus initially on the residential market and reflects both the depth and scale of the challenge which will require a broad multi-disciplinary approach.

The pilot is the first of SEAI’s multi-annual pilots which will investigate the challenges and opportunities that deep retrofit presents to the pre-2006 domestic housing stock. The learning from these pilots will inform SEAI’s approach and support towards the large-scale deep retrofit of buildings in Ireland.

Funding will be provided to projects that demonstrate an integrated, comprehensive strategy for significantly improving home energy performance. Conor Hanniffy is the Programme Manager for the scheme. With a background in mechanical engineering, Conor has over 18 years programme management experience in private and public sectors. He previously managed SEAI’s Accelerated Capital Allowance Programme for energy efficient equipment, and the Building Energy Rating (BER) Programme.

To support the early development of the Deep Retrofit Pilot Programme, SEAI has published both a definition, and the guiding principles, behind the concept to assist in providing a clear market target. Guidance underpinning high-quality delivery of deep retrofit pilot projects will include Standard Recommendations 54 (SR 54).

What is deep retrofit?                                                                                                                                         Deep retrofit is the significant upgrade of a building toward nearly zero energy requirements where it is practically feasible and achievable. SEAI has also provided the following guiding principles to support this definition:

— Minimum A3 Building Energy Rating (A3) requirement with a minimum of 150kWh/m2/yr uplift in the BER energy value;

— Whole-house solution focused on a fabric first approach;

— Deployment of renewables transition away from fossil fuels. The pilot scheme will only support renewable energy sources as a method for heating and electricity generation.

Who is scheme aimed at?                                                                                                                                   With a target market of one million homes, the pilot scheme will target building archetypes which are representative of building stock. SEAI invites projects to be delivered via community groups, local authorities, energy agencies and private-sector deep retrofit service providers who can provide end-to-end project delivery.

How are the projects funded?                                                                                                                               SEAI will provide up to 50% funding of the total capital costs and project management costs (including design fees). For voluntary housing association homes, and the homes of those that are in energy poverty (defined as meeting the Warmer Homes eligibility criteria), SEAI will provide a much higher rate of funding, up to 95%. This is only available as part of a wider project that includes a mix of non-energy poverty homes (75%) with the energy poverty component subvention applied to 25% of the total number of homes in each project.

The pilot provides an opportunity to show how the deep retrofit of dwellings can be achieved using a “fabric upgrade first” approach (insulation, windows and doors) coupled with renewable energy technologies. It will also provide an opportunity to demonstrate the  importance of ventilation systems for ensuring sufficient indoor air quality where the building’s airtightness has been improved.

SEAI will also provide a significant contribution to a mandatory pre-works and post-works BER to demonstrate the upgrade, and an air-pressure test package to maximise the impact of energy efficiency works.

Toward zero deep retrofit conference                                                                                                               SEAI recently hosted its inaugural deep retrofit conference which brought together over 200 key stakeholders. This included policy-makers, state bodies, researchers, project managers, property owners and landlords, technology providers, financiers and contractors.

This event will act as an annual review and information sharing platform as to best practice and innovation, research findings and delivery of deep retrofit in Ireland across all demographic areas, technologies and building types.

A broad range of international and national speakers shared insights and experience from the following perspectives — vision and policy; behavioural insights; building capacity; and leveraging the opportunity.

All presentations and the recorded webcast are available at:—                               www.seai.ie/Grants/Deep-Retrofit-Programme/

Building Services Engineering Graduate Builds Career from Level 6 Start

Paul Martin, SEAI Programme Manager and CIBSE Ireland Chairman

Looking back to his Leaving Cert subjects — accounting, geography and business studies — Paul comments that they weren’t “traditional” engineering subjects but his interest in engineering was evident from an interest in how things worked … much to the detriment of his sister’s CD player. From his Level 6 Higher Cert, Paul progressed onto a level 7 add-on and, from there, he went to the UK to do further studies.

“Now that that the economy and construction are picking up“, notes Paul, “and there is a huge demand for building service engineering graduates and says that, compared with traditional engineering qualifications, building services engineers are paid more.”

Paul is now a Chartered Engineer and Programme Manager for Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) and in charge of Technical Standards Development. “My day to day job is developing standards that will insure that we will live in a more sustainable country, and in influencing other EU countries to follow our lead,” he explains.

In 2017 he was elected Chairperson of the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers, Ireland Region. “This position will allow me to help influence our members (and beyond) in the latest and greatest engineering developments.”

“I am a very proud graduate of WIT and I was delighted to see the standard of the course held high (20 years on) when I judged the Building Services Student Awards last year in WIT. The lecturers always had time for their students and in particular were always helpful when I couldn’t get my head around some of the aspects of the course.

“I couldn’t recommend the Building Services course in WIT more. I know talking to employers that graduates from WIT are held in high esteem”, concluded.

Related Courses in WIT

Higher Certificate in Engineering in  Building Services Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering in  Building Services Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in  Sustainable Energy Engineering

 

Home Heating Heroes Do It Best!

Joe Durkan, EEOS Programme Manager, SEAI

Plumbers and installers are the “go-to” guys in these situations. Whether it is emergency repairs, upgrades or a completely new installation, homeowners rely on their knowledge and expertise to advise them on the right approach. They represent the interface between  the home owner and the wider world of energy efficiency. They have become, in a sense, energy ambassadors.

This is because, in order to ensure that the heating system is correctly specified, the plumber first needs to be able to accurately determine the actual heating demand of the home based on the details of the property and the needs of the occupant. This is where a great opportunity lies, because in order to calculate the heating load, the specifier needs to assess the building fabric, ventilation system and existing distribution system in the dwelling.

In the case of new or yet to be built dwellings, all of the information to determine this data should be readily to hand. Details of the construction, such as the levels of insulation, build type, ventilation systems etc, should all be known and these, in conjunction with the Building Energy Rating (BER) heat loss calculations, will help accurately determine what the heating requirement will be.

However, the majority of heating system installations are more likely to fall into replacements or upgrades. In these cases, especially when a BER isn’t readily available, the specifier has to determine the heating demand the old fashioned way. CIBSE’s Domestic Heating Design Guide (www. cibse.org/knowledge/knowledge-items/ detail?id=a0q20000008I7odAAC) is the key tool in these situations. The guide shows how to identify the principle heat loss areas in the dwelling, and how to calculate the relevant u-values, ventilation rates and distribution losses necessary to determine the heating requirements of each room and the overall hot water and space heating demand.

Minimising this overall heat demand is the key to an economical and efficient heating solution. Ultimately, the type of heat source is secondary to the more important considerations of ensuring that the heat demand can be met efficiently and economically, and that all elements are installed to the proper standards.

The information gleaned in the initial the homeowner could carry out, such as insulation or controls upgrades, that will reduce the overall heating demand. This is the opportune time to consider these works, and carrying them out in conjunction with the heating system upgrade will be more economical. The overall result will be greatly-improved levels of comfort and reduced heating bills (courtesy of the appropriately-sized heating system).

Almost certainly, the new heat supply (whether it’s a boiler, stove or heat pump) will require a lower rated heat output than the unit it is replacing. This is because the overall efficiency of heating appliances has improved dramatically over the last number of years. Therefore, it is vital that the installer accurately determines  the heat load required to ensure that  the replacement unit is correctly sized to operate at maximum efficiency.

Click on the image right and see full article on Pages 14 and 15.

Emergency Lighting Standard IS 3217:2013 Amendment

Gearoid McKenna, the LAI representative on the National Standards Authority of Ireland Fire Safety Standards Committee.

IS 3217:2013 was originally published on 27 December, 2013 further to the first edition which was unveiled in 1989 and the second edition in 2008. The standard is produced with the assistance of the National Standards Authority of Ireland Fire Safety Standards Committee that is made up of representatives from the following – ACEI; OPW; IFE; ECA; AECI; LAI; EMDA; CFOA; NDFEM; FIAI; HSA and emergency lighting manufacturers.

Subsequent to the publishing of IS 3217:2013, the committee decided to meet one year later to review the standard and discuss any feedback. There was a considerable amount of feedback and queries into various sections and clauses, most notably Section 10 Central Power Systems and Clause 8.5.2.2. which deals with lift cars and lift shafts. There was also some editorial feedback.

The committee met a number of times to deliberate on this feedback before producing a draft amendment that was then circulated for public enquiry. At the end of the public enquiry period 40 submitted comments were collated and each comment was considered in detail by the committee.

The final draft amendment, which included requirements in line with European standards which had been published since the original publication date, was then approved by the committee and forwarded to NSAI for approval and publication.

The part of the standard dealing with lift cars and lift shafts was amended to include 5 lux minimum in and around the car. In the pit a minimum of 1 lux is required. Details of the siting of the luminaires were specified.

Central Power Systems, Section10 was where most of the amendments were made. The committee completely reviewed this section dealing with cables, wiring systems and circuit requirements. Cabling options have been added with clear guidance to size of cables, survival times and stated applicable standards.

Section 10.2.3: Interconnection of Luminaires was added. This section is about the protection of emergency escape lighting within an escape route where escape lighting is provided by either a single or two or more circuits. It details the cabling, connections to the luminaire, fusing and junction boxes. Annex K was added to demonstrate typical wiring arrangements for single and multiple compartments.

Section.3.3 Joints was amended to comply with Section 10.2.3. Details of the enclosures with survival times of 90 and 60 minutes were added. E90 & E60 enclosures complying with DIN4102-12 are deemed to meet these requirements. These amendments, among others including editorial changes, are now in IS 3217:2013+A1:2017 which is available from NSAI.

The next step for IS 3217 is a complete review of the entire standard which is conducted between three and five years after the publication date. The National Standards Authority of Ireland Fire Safety Standards Committee has already commenced this process.

Contact: NSAI. Tel: 01 – 807 3800; email: info@nsai.ie; www.nsai.ie

LAI Builds on renewed momentum

Gay Byrne, Chairman, Lighting Association Ireland (LAI)

“LAI has now gained considerable momentum in recent months”, says Gay, “and we are extremely pleased with our progress to date. Indeed, the manner in which all sectors of the lighting industry in Ireland, and abroad, has responded has been most encouraging.

“Right from the outset LAI has had an outward-looking approach, our objective being to reach out to — and engage with — all the professionals involved in lighting. To that end we have had preliminary discussions with most of the lighting-related professional bodies and representative organisations, and have formed working relationships that will be further developed over the coming weeks and months.

“We have a firm structure of steering committees and sub-committees in place so that the various strands of our activities progress in parallel. While separate, they do not operate in isolation but maintain close contacts so that all developments proceed in tandem, and in a cohesive manner.

“For instance, our CPD programme is now well advanced and we expect to unveil a strong line-up of speakers and topics that we can roll out under the LAI banner shortly to all lighting professionals. We have had excellent engagement with the other lighting-related professional bodies on this and the intention is to conduct joint CPD events over the course of the year.

“With Brexit looming we have also looked further afield. We have had a number of discussions with the European lighting representative body and, while these will continue, we have forged a much closer relationship the Lighting Industry Association (LIA) in the UK. We see that we have a great deal in common with one another and plan to develop mutually-beneficial ties to maximise our shared strengths and interests.

“That said, LAI is also about the lighting community, the people within the industry. To that end we have become involved in the Peter Church Rememberance Golf Outing. This is a joint initiative between Peter’s wife, Louise, their daughters Megan, Olivia and Laura, Reg Farrell and LAI.

“At the request of Louise and the family it is being organised as a charity event, the objective being to raise funds for LauraLynn, Ireland’s Childrens’ Hospice, Leopardstown and Our Lady’s Hospice & Cares Services, Harold’s Cross.

“Venue is The Castle Golf Club in Dublin and the date is Friday, 22 September 2017. It is €600 to enter a team (to include golf and buffet). There are also sponsorship opportunities of €100 per tee box. Fill details are available at www.laoi.ie

“As the foregoing indicates, LAI has gained considerable momentum since its relatively recent formation, and the industry response has been tremendous. New members are coming on board at an increasing rate with LAI now firmly recognised as the voice of lighting in Ireland.”

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