Category Archives: Article

Entry deadline looming for CIBSE Ireland inaugural awards

Pictured at the announcement of the
CIBSE Ireland Awards were (front row):
David Doherty, T Bourke and CIBSE Ireland
Committee; Paul Martin, SEAI and CIBSE
Ireland Chair; Michael O’Herlihy, Wilo Ireland;
and Damien Flynn, Axiseng and Vice-Chair,
CIBSE Ireland; (second row): Pat Lehane,
CIBSE Ireland Committee and Publisher/
Editor, Building Services News; Derek Elton,
Wilo Ireland and Kieran McCarthy, Daikin
Ireland; (third row) Karl Carrick and Garrett
White, Hevac; (back row): Richard Sherlock,
Mitsubishi Electric, John Valentine, Daikin
Ireland and Fergus Daly, Mitsubishi Electric.

This is a reminder that the entry deadline for these new awards is fast-approaching so log on to www.cibseireland.org/awards2018/  now if you don’t miss out. These awards are open to the design consultant and mechanical or electrical contractor, and submissions must be a joint entry by both the consultant and contractor. Buildings that are eligible for submission include – hospitality, leisure, health, commercial, industrial, retail, pharmaceutical, educational facilities and office buildings.

There are three categories for the CIBSE Ireland Awards, and they are sponsored respectively by Daikin, Hevac and Wilo. These are – Up to €2 million; Between €2 million and €5 million; Over €5 million. Applicants may enter only one project per category.

Projects can be located anywhere in the Republic of Ireland and entries must be submitted by the design consultant/project engineer on behalf of the design and contracting teams. Projects must be “practical completed” by 31 December 2017 (i.e. available for client use in January 2018) to be eligible for inclusion. Log on to www.cibseireland.org to enter and complete as directed.

Hard copy completed submissions must be returned to CIBSE Ireland Awards, c/o Building Services News, Carraig Court, George’s Avenue, Blackrock, Co Dublin, no later than 2pm on Friday, 27 July 2018.

The awards will be presented as part of the CIBSE Ireland 50th dinner celebrations in the Clayton Hotel, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4 on Friday, 30 November, 2018.

Photometrics the key to best lighting design

Photometrics key to best lighting design

The historical significance of the church and ruins, and the prominent elevated site they occupy overlooking the town, made for an ideal lighting project. However, it was also a challenging one in that it called for a customised lighting solution that would offer all the possibilities of modern-day lighting technology but one that was sensitive and sympathetic to the architecture and history of the site, and especially to the fact that it also incorporates a graveyard.

Having considered their options, Wexford County Council appointed Al Reid Electrical, who has extensive experience in this area, to carry out the project. They in turn partnered with Gay Byrne, Chairman of Lighting Association Ireland and Managing Director of Enlighten (part of the Fantasy Lights Group) to come up with the final solution that has won many accolades since it was switched on.

The design process began with an exhaustive site survey that included photography, extensive and very detailed measurements of the various building ruins, the use of old images and Google technologies. These were then used to create a 3D recreation of the whole site and one that took into account how the lighting would impact not just from the town, but also from the sea.

Once the 3D process was completed this data was then computerised by way of an advanced programme to create the photometrics. These are essential in ensuring that the light levels achieved are correct and appropriate for the sensitivity of the site itself, and the surrounding area. It was not like lighting a football stadium to levels suitable for TV broadcast of field games, but rather delivering a solution that was in keeping with the fact that it houses centuries-old ruins and an operational church of unique architectural heritage.

The use of the photometrics was essential in devising and indeed visually demonstrating (see images, right) the different light levels required for the various buildings on the site, and to test and visualise the different optics that were required. They also facilitated visualisation of the varying effects that can be achieved by setting the fittings at different angles and mounting positions. For instance, some of the façade fittings are mounted on poles.

The light fittings chosen were high-quality Griven units incorporating RGBW technology. In addition to an RGB chip, they also feature an individual white light chip which is the only way to achieve pure white. This was essential in delivering the final desired effect. Griven is one of the market-leading manufacturers in the architectural lighting sector, featuring a comprehensive catalogue of proven quality, high reliability and fully weather-proofed lighting fixtures that offer innovative and alternative colour-changing solutions. A mix of different Griven luminaires were used on the project.

The overall lighting solution is controlled by a DMX management system that can be accessed and operated from a computer through to an ipad and mobile telephone. This role is delivered off site by Al Reid Electrical but, for the most part, the colour-changing is pre-programmed to coincide with various dates, festivals, events, national holidays, etc.

That the final solution provided is perfect and fit-for-purpose is evident for all to see. However, the importance of the detailed site survey, research and accumulation of all manner of data to create the 3D imagery which in turn leads to the computerised photometrics cannot be overstated.

Excellent presentations at SDAR Awards 2018

Back Row: Michael McDonald (DIT) with Charles Dunn (CIBSE/RPS), Dr Avril Behan (DIT) and Gerry Farrelly (DIT)
Front Row : Padraic O’Connor (SISK) with Thomas Shannon, Mona Holtkotter, Camila Dbastiani and Dr Kevin Kelly (DIT)

The SDAR awards promote collaboration between industry and academic institutions. The idea is to encourage applied research and ensure quality and value in innovation projects. The more research papers and post-occupancy evaluations undertaken, the more sustainable design and energy efficacy in future and existing buildings can be encouraged.

The role of CIBSE in this regard is to facilitate this process and disseminate the findings. The event was opened by Dr Kevin Kelly,Head of the School of Multidisciplinary Technologies and Vice-President, CIBSE, and Michael McDonald. Michael is the event organiser, a member of the CIBSE Ireland Committee and alecturer at the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

The expert judging panel consisted of Gerry Farrelly and Dr Avril Behan, DIT and Charles Dunn, RPS and CIBSE Committee. First prize went to Mona Holtkötter of the International WELL Building Institute and Secretary of CIBSE Ireland. Mona’s research on the potential impact of the updated Building Regulations Part L on current building design strategies, using a Dublin city centre office building as an example, was a narrow but deserved winner following her excellent presentation. The title of the paper was The new Irish Building Regulations Part L 2017: the impact on city centre developments. Padraic O’Connor, Building Services Department Manager at Sisk & Son, presented her with a cheque for €1000.

The two runners up (in no particular order) were as follows.

— Influence of the biogas generated on the mixing of UASB bioreactors: Comparison of CFD and experiential results by Camila D’Bastiani of DIT (Ph.D. Researcher);

— A case study into the integration of technological and engineering innovations in a manufacturing/distribution facility to support a sustainable future by Tommy Shannon of Excel Industries.

They each received €250 courtesy of CIBSE Ireland, the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and the School of Multidisciplinary Technologies.

Lighter/Young Lighter competition                                                                                                                     The second upcoming major event is the CIBSE Irish Lighter/Young Lighter competition. This is well established as a premier national and international lighting competition, and will be accepting abstracts from mid-June.

Contact michael.mcdonald@dit.ie or kevin.kelly@dit.ie

IRI dinner, awards and expo success

Seamus Kerr pictured at the IRI Dinner and Awards night with Derek Byrne.

The venue was the Grand Hotel, Malahide. After the inaugural delegate registration and exposition, approximately 200 industry personnel, and their guests, enjoyed an excellent meal, the presentation of the awards, and music and dancing into the early hours. Details of the awards, winners and sponsors follow.

Apprentice of the Year Award                                                                                                This award is for apprentices who have excelled in their final SOLAS assessments in refrigeration and air conditioning and was sponsored by Solas. There were two presentations, covering 2017 and 2018. Michael Farrell, Anglo Irish Refrigeration received the 2017 award from Martin O’Brien of CIT while Jim Ffrench, DIT presented the 2018 award to John Levins, also of Anglo Irish Refrigeration.

Energy & Environmental Award                                                                                            This award is for companies who show a track record of reducing their environmental impact and gaining significant energy savings. It was sponsored by Danfoss with Stephen Molloy making the presentations. Results were as follows:

Highly Commended – Sirus Engineering Systems for the Mitsubishi Electric HVRF air conditioning system installed on a major project;

Winner – Daikin for its R32 Sky Air system.

Training Award                                                                                                                                                       This is for companies who have excelled in the provision of training for their staff and customers. It is sponsored by Carel Ireland and the presentations were made by Dave Killalea. Results were as follows.

Highly commended – Musgraves;

Winner – Anglo Irish Refrigeration.

Innovation Award                                                                                                                                                  This is for companies, or Individuals, who have contributed most to new technologies and ideas applied to the RAC and HV industry applications environment. It was sponsored by Daikin. Results were as follows.

Highly Commended – Crystal Air;

Winner – Higgins Refrigeration.

Contribution to Industry Award                                                                                                                        This is for individuals who have promoted and supported the RAC industry over a prolonged period of time. It was sponsored by Mitsubishi Electric and the winner was John Sampsom.

Heat pump grant details explained

Why heat pumps?                                                                                                                            Primarily to accelerate the move away from fossil fuels towards renewable forms of heating. Hence the discontinuation of the grant for oil/gas boilers with controls, and the introduction of a single higher grant for heating controls only. The addition of a heat pump grant arises from the ongoing review of the programme and the objective of supporting more renewable heating options, on top of the solar

Heat pumps are very efficient electrical devices that convert energy from the outside of the home into useful heat in the home, in the same way a fridge extracts heat from its inside. They even work in Ireland’s cold winters. This extracted heat can then be used to heat the home and hot water. The beauty of a heat pump is that every unit of electricity used in the process yields about four units of heat. In well-insulated houses they are very economical to run and are an extremely efficient alternative to fossil fuel-based heating systems. There are different types of heat pumps including air-to-water, ground source to water, exhaust air-to-water, water-to-water and air-to-air heat pumps.

Why the focus on “fabric first” for heat pumps?                                                                  For optimum efficiency, heat pumps should only be installed in well-insulated homes. If the home is not properly insulated it is highly likely that it will not be heated properly and the homeowner’s electricity bills will be higher than expected. To address this, SEAI has introduced a process to ensure that the homes are suitable for a heat pump based on a “fabric first” approach.

The minimum requirement will be based on the total heat loss for the dwelling, which includes the fabric and ventilation heat loss. The Heat Loss Indicator, or HLI, is the Total Heat Loss per m2 of dwelling floor area. This can be calculated using the Dwelling Energy Assessment Procedure or DEAP software used to determine a home’s Building Energy Rating. The HLI will be used to determine the energy performance of the dwelling for the purpose of the Better Energy Homes grants for heat pump systems and must be no more than 2W/K m2..

Central to determining this calculation will be the role of an independent SEAI registered Technical Advisor who will carry out the required technical assessment to determine the suitability of a home for a heat pump system.

How can the Heat Loss Indicator (HLI) of a poorly-performing home be improved?                          The Technical Assessment report will set out the specifics for each individual home. It is likely to include recommendations to improve the insulation of the walls, attic and possibly floor. It may also require the installation of high-performance double or triple-glazed windows and doors. Doing this will generally make a home more airtight. This is good but will necessitate a ventilation strategy for occupant health and to protect against condensation effects. That might sound like a contradiction, but ventilation is extremely important.

SEAI already offers grants for three types of wall insulation (external wall insulation, internal dry lining and cavity wall insulation) as well as attic insulation.

Who is the Technical Advisor and what does he/she do?                                                                         An independent SEAI registered Technical Advisor will be an engineer, architect, quantity surveyor or relevant construction professional who is also a registered Domestic BER Assessor and who has attended an SEAI Technical Advisor workshop.

(S)he will use the DEAP software to determine the Heat Loss Indicator and thus the home’s suitability for a heat pump. This information may already be available from a current valid BER for the property. If no current BER exists then the advisor will publish an up-to-date BER, a prerequisite for a heat pump grant. The Technical Advisor will produce a Technical Assessment which will indicate that either the home is already heat pump ready or, if not, what upgrades are necessary to make it so.

At the time of applying for a heat pump grant the homeowner is required to upload the Technical Assessment document attesting to the home’s eligibility or what needs to be done to achieve eligibility. Where upgrade works are necessary then the Technical Assessment document can be used by the homeowner to get quotes from contractors for these works. Homeowners who successfully proceed with a grant-aided heat pump system installation will receive a €200 grant towards the cost of the Technical Advisor.

The introduction of the independent SEAI registered Technical Advisor role is a further step to help professionalise residential retrofitting. SEAI will soon publish a list of independent SEAI-registered Technical Advisors on its website. To be eligible for registration candidates must be a registered Domestic BER Assessor and have a FETAC Level 7 in engineering/architecture/quantity surveying/construction or equivalent (must demonstrate adequate experience and full membership of relevant professional associations).

What are the requirements to register as a heat pump installer?                                                            To be eligible to register as a heat pump installer for the Better Energy Homes programme, candidates must have:

— Fetac Level 6 Plumbing Certificate with minor in electrics;

— A Certificate of Competency from the manufacturer(s) of the appliance(s) they intend to install;

— From 1 January 2019 Fetac Level 6 in Heat Pump Installation, or registration on SEAI’s Register of Renewables Installers.

As with all other registered contractors under the programme, heat pump installers will also be required to abide by the Better Energy Homes Terms and Conditions, including requirements to be tax compliant and properly insured. They must complete the installation in full accordance with the Code of Practice. They will also be subject to SEAI’s quality assurance and disciplinary procedure. The heat pump section in the Code of Practice is now being updated.

Are there any differences to other Better Energy Homes grant eligibility terms?                              Aside from the requirement for the Technical Assessment report, only one eligibility term is different for the heat pump system grant. The year of construction and first occupation for the home in question must be before 2011. This eligibility criteria has also been extended to the solar thermal grant. Homes built after this date were subject to Building Regulations which mandated a minimum level of renewables.

[For insulation grants and heating control grants under the Better Energy Homes programme, the requirement remains unchanged where construction and first occupation must be before 2006].

A Tribute to Sean Mulcahy

Sean Mulcahy’s impressive
engineering career spanned almost the
entire second half of the 20th century,
from the post-war years right up to the
early dawn of the Celtic Tiger era.

Over that long period the practice and science of building services engineering in Ireland developed from its very humble beginnings to embrace a myriad of highly-sophisticated engineering applications. Seán played a major role in that transformation through his belief in providing sound engineering advice, embodying both a sense of design excellence and a spirit of innovation.

To gain some insight into the influences that moulded this belief, it is necessary to factor in Seán’s family history and his early career experiences. Seán was born in 1926 into an Ireland that was still emerging from a turbulent decade of social upheaval, armed revolt and a highly-divisive civil war. Seán’s father was very active in these events and continued in a prominent political role for many years.

Seán was the youngest of six siblings. While not blessed with robust health, as a child he had already begun to exhibit the characteristics of gentleness and creativity that would endear him to so many of his acquaintances in his later life.

He decided on a career in building services engineering as it seemed to him, back in 1947, that building services engineering might well be a rapidly-expanding field. Fatefully, his interest was drawn to a Danish building services consultancy practice, J Varming & Company, which had just opened a design office in Dublin. Seán’s decision to accept a position with this company was one which was to shape his engineering career for the following five decades.

Jørgen Varming became Seán’s first “boss”, his mentor, business partner and a life-long friend. They went on to discover that they shared the same vision and values, not only for buildings and engineering, but also for art and music.

Jørgen Varming shared offices with Michael Scott and Ove Arup in Scott’s Merrion Square Building in those early years and the newly-appointed young graduate was assigned some minor engineering design for the  Busáras office building. However, he soon realised that his university education had taught him little about building services engineering and nothing about architecture. To develop the fundamentals of these skills,

Varming sent Seán to Copenhagen for a year, his first time out of Ireland, to work for a Danish electrical contractor. Seán returned to Dublin from Copenhagen in June 1949 a committed building designer and an architect, albeit one specialising in the limited field of building engineering systems. The design of the mechanical and electrical installations in Busáras offered opportunities for innovation and so it should not come as a total surprise that the fire-fighting installation included a basic sprinkler system.

As the years went by, the complement of local Irish engineers increased and gradually the Danish engineers returned to the Copenhagen Office. Seán was appointed partner in charge of the Dublin Office, resulting in a change of name to J Varming & S Mulcahy. Seán persuaded Brian Reilly, a college friend, to return from England and join him in the new set-up. This was another key relationship that endured for  the remainder of their professional working lives.

Ireland in the 1950s was not in a good economic state and the prospects for maintaining their small consulting engineering practice were becoming daunting for Seán and Brian. However, rather than consider retrenching, Seán’s reaction was to expand. With such a plan in mind, he approached Jørgen Varming in Copenhagen and, in 1957, on Ove Arup’s recommendation, they set up in London, styled as Steensen Varming Mulcahy. A second SVM office was opened in Edinburgh in 1959.

Having been based essentially in London and Edinburgh for over 10 years, Seán returned to the Dublin Office in the late 1960s, a decade which had seen a strong revival of the fortunes of the Dublin practice now styled as Varming Mulcahy Reilly Associates.

In a talk recorded in 1982, Seán gave his views on how engineering services enable modern architecture. He related enthusiastically to the definition of Henry Wooton that “the qualities of a building are those of commodity, firmness and delight. The structural engineer identifies his particular role with firmness. The building services engineer, his with commodity or performance, and both engineers believe with some justification that the architect’s concern is often with delight”.

Seán admired how Reiner Banham – in his book, published in 1969, Architecture of the Well-Tempered Environment – set out the truly essential role of engineering services in modern building design. Banham pointed out that the functioning of all large or tall buildings is utterly dependent on ventilation, on lifts, on plumbing and on communications. Banham hypothesised that the single unique distinction of success of modern architecture design resides in the performance of its engineering services.

Jørgen Varming passed to his eternal reward in September 1996. At his funeral in Gentofte outside Copenhagen, the pastor began his homily with the striking words “The light of a most shining person has been extinguished very quietly, having burned for a long, long time, and we are all left so very strangely in the dark.”

Many of us with Varming roots can relate to these words and will have experienced the same sensation on the occasion of Seán’s recent passing.

Happily, the torch lit by Jørgen Varming in Dublin in 1946 is enduring and has been carried forward by successive generations of Irish Varming engineers. Seán Mulcahy will always be recognised, and remembered, as the main torch bearer.

Hywel Davis advises on Grenfel Tower Report

Hywel Davis, Technical Director, CIBSE UK, and a member of the UK Government Committee preparing the Grenfel Tower Report.

The business end of the visit involved a special briefing by Hywel to senior Government officials in relation to the probe being conducted into Grenfell fire disaster, and the report being prepared. The probe is led by Dame Judith Hackitt with the interim report already released. See: (www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-report-from-the-independent-recovery-taskforc). Hywel also had a separate briefing meeting with the RIAI.

On the social side Nial Bourke and David Doherty of T Bourke hosted Hywel, a proud Welsh man, as their guest to the rugby international in the Aviva stadium. Even with the result Hywel was in great form and has promised to return to Ireland to update everyone on the Grenfell final report, and to join us for CIBSE Ireland’s 50th anniversary dinner in the Autumn.

Schools visit to promote building services engineering                                                                  On the broader front, and to coincide with Engineering Week, Paul Martin and Mervin Doyle toured a number of schools in the Waterford region to try and get primary and secondary school children to consider building services engineering as a career. Mervin is a lecturer in the Waterford Institute of Technology in the degree in Building Services Engineering, and the Masters in Sustainable Engineering.

Their tour started in St Declan’s Primary school where Paul was a student over 30 years ago. They met Paul’s old teacher, Gerald Fitzgerald — still teaching despite having taught Paul for over three years — and Paul spoke to the children about sustainability and the environment. He concluded his presentation by showing them the latest Nisan Leaf electric vehicle kindly provided by John Flood of Nissan Dungarvan dungarvan.nissan.ie/

From there Mervin and Paul ventured into their old secondary school, De La Salle. Here they spoke with 4th and 5th year students about the WIT courses in building services engineering, and the related employment and career prospects. Much to Mervin and Paul’s disappointment, neither Derek McGrath (Waterford hurling Manager), nor Kevin Moran (Waterford senior hurling captain) were teaching that day … they were relaxing after hammering Cork in the league.

From here they went to St Paul’s School where again they spoke to over 50 students. Mind you, here the students were more proactive and there was some lively debate when they asked of Paul and Mervin: “who earned the most money”; “who drove the newest car”; and “who had the handiest job”. As CIBSE Ireland Chair Paul claimed the right to answer and said Mervin to all.

For more information about the Degree and Master (Part and full time) courses in WIT visit:—www.wit.ie/schools/engineering/building_services          www.wit.ie/courses/school/engineering/PostgraduateEngineeringDepartment%20of%20Built%20EnvironmentFull%20TimePart%20Time/msc_in_sustainable_energy_engineering

 

 

SEAI Calling All Energy Engineers

Programme Manager – SME Support Programme                                                                                          This role will be required to create a new unit to work with SMEs on energy efficiency. Priority in 2018 will be to develop a strategy, design and roll out an expanded programme of support specifically targeted at the small and medium sized enterprise to leverage the opportunity presented by energy efficiency for this sector.

Programme Executive – Public Sector Energy Management                                                                        The role within the Public Sector and Business Department is to manage and co-ordinate the energy management support services that SEAI provide to the public sector to promote and accelerate energy management.

Programme Executive – Large Business                                                                                                        The role within the Business and Public Sector Department is to design and develop programmes, events and initiatives supporting those responsible for energy in client organisations with high energy use to adopt good energy management practices.

Programme Manager – EXEED Certified                                                                                                            This role will lead both the ongoing development of EXEED Certified and its supporting EXEED Grant programme. You will have ownership across the full EXEED value-chain.

Programme Executive – Market Surveillance Authority                                                                                This is a technical engineering role to support the operation and on-going development of market surveillance activities by SEAI. The role will principally focus on energy related products relating to eco-design, energy labelling and tyre labelling.

Programme Executive – Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme                                                                  This role will support the on-going Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme programme development and technical oversight activities.

Programme Assistant – Energy Policy Statistical Support Unit                                                                  This role will provide assistance in relation to statistical data management and analysis within SEAI’s Energy Policy Statistical Support Unit (EPSSU).

See   www.seai.ie/careers/ for full details

END

 

 

Designing future-proofed buildings for next 50 years

Paul Martin, Chairman, CIBSE Ireland

In the intervening years the industry has learned from the many mistakes made back in the late 1960s and early 1970s in particular. Building stock constructed since then has shown marked improvement but, as we look to design buildings that will be here for the next 50, we should not be complacent.

Buildings that are performing well now, and those currently being designed and built for the today’s climatic conditions, may become intolerable for occupants by 2068 (50 years time) unless we factor in concepts such as active cooling and associated high-energy usage. There is compelling scientific evidence that our climate is changing, and it is probable that average temperatures will increase by several degrees over the coming century.

These increases in temperature are expected to have a major impact on the indoor environment of buildings. It is essential that buildings being designed and built today are future-proofed so they can adapt to changes in external temperatures and humidity, light levels, energy usage and so on.

To be fair, the construction industry has already made significant steps towards tackling climate change through limiting the amount of carbon emitted – both in the materials used (embodied energy) and predicted energy usage – by using simulation programmes such as IES, along with BREEAM and LEED.

The energy message emphasis on heat-saving in winter using highly-insulated and airtight buildings also means there is a danger of overheating in the summer months. This presents a different challenge. CIBSE has produced quite a number of guidance documents in this respect, such as TM52 (The limits of thermal comfort: avoiding overheating in European buildings: Developed for “free-running” commercial buildings) and TM59 (Design methodology for the assessment of overheating risk in homes).

The health and wellbeing impacts of overheating (see Mona Holtkoetter’s article in October 2017 edition of Building Services News) can be significant for residents, resulting in stress, anxiety, sleep deprivation and even early deaths in heatwaves, especially in cases of vulnerable occupants.

Among the concepts now being embraced to combat these issues are highly-insulated pipework; insulated heat interface units; ventilated utility cupboards; LED lighting; and installing mechanical ventilation heat recovery units, with summer bypass and boost mode, to increase the ventilation rate when required.

Climate change is affecting how buildings will perform for occupants, both now and in the future. While overheating has emerged as a major concern, climate effects extend beyond the treatment of overheating. They also include flooding, drainage, water conservation and material durability. The CIBSE TM36: Climate Change & the Indoor Environment: Impacts & Adaptation (CIBSE, 2005) document again offers guidance and advice on these matters.

In considering the design of both commercial and residential buildings today we must address the known and anticipated challenges that lie ahead and consider, among other things, the following:

• To what extent will climate change increase the occurrence of summertime thermal discomfort and overheating in different types of buildings?

• To what extent will passive measures be able to improve summertime thermal comfort and ameliorate the increased tendency for overheating?

• How effective will different approaches to comfort cooling be?

• What are the energy-use implications of the various strategies?

While no one has all the answers, there is still a wealth of guidance freely available to all concerned in building services.

See www.cibseireland.org/membership/ for details, or contact CIBSE Ireland directly at contact@cibseireland.org

LAI CE Regulation Course kicks off 2018 programme

Gabriel Byrne, LAI Chairman, addressing the attendance at the recent CE course in the RDS before handing over to Andy Guest, the course presenter from LIA.

This course was specifically devised by LIA for its members in the UK but LAI has also adopted accreditation to it it as part of its membership criteria.

The nature of the course is more like a workshop with inter-action and discussion a key part of the proceedings. The capacity attendance in the RDS fully embraced the concept and participated with enthusiasm, sharing views and opinions on the various points raised. All agreed that it was extremely educational and beneficial.

Apart from an important information source, accreditation as having completed this course is also critical in that it is now part of the requirements of LAI membership. The recent AGM passed a motion approving a measure whereby at least one person from member companies must have accreditation as having successfully completed this course.

This, and other initiatives planned for 2018, demonstrate LAI’s determination to provide guidance and leadership to the lighting sector in Ireland, and to promote professional and responsibility. It will continue to promote best practice across all industry segments, and to engage with Government agencies and regulatory authorities, especially the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI), with whom it has a number of working committees.

Gay Byrne, LAI Chairman, addressing the attendance at the recent CE course in the RDS before handing over to Andy Guest, the course presenter from LIA.